Another Prestigious Law School Documents Civilian Impact of Drone Strikes

Just a few days after Stanford and NYU Human Rights Law Clinics issued a report condemning the humanitarian consequences of US drone strikes on Pakistan, Columbia University’s Law School and Center for Civilians in Conflict has issued another report, on the “Unexamined Costs” and “Unanswered Questions” regarding the “civilian impact” of “the US government’s covert drone program”:

Drones are touted as the most precise and humane weapons platform in the history of warfare … but covert drone strikes carry costs for civilians and local communities even as they become a policy norm. Blinded by the promise of this technology … policymakers are failing to ask hard questions…, including whether other tactics or strategies are more appropriate to counterterrorism strategy, and whether US expansion of strikes to new places and against new groups is truly justified.

To download their report, click here.

For an earlier blog post on the the humanitarian impact of drone strikes, click here.

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~ by Matthew Bolton on 30 September 2012.

2 Responses to “Another Prestigious Law School Documents Civilian Impact of Drone Strikes”

  1. […] editorial comes just days after reports from three influential law schools — Columbia, NYU and Stanford – raised serious reservations about the civilian impact of drone strikes. […]

  2. […] robotic weapons are more troubling. Just in the last few days three influential law schools — Columbia, NYU and Stanford — raised serious reservations about the civilian impact of drone strikes. […]

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